Friday, 19 October 2012

signs and symptoms of hepatitis, Treatment of Hepatitis


Many people with Hepatitis experience either mild symptoms or none at all. Remember that an infected person's feces are always infectious to other people. When symptoms appear, they usually do so about 15 to 180 days after the person has become infected.

The acute phase of hepatitis - symptoms

The initial phase of hepatitis is called the acute phase. The symptoms are like a mild flu, and may include:
  • Diarrhea
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of appetite
  • Mild fever
  • Muscle or joint aches
  • Nausea
  • Slight abdominal pain
  • Vomiting
  • Weight loss
The acute phase is not usually dangerous, unless it develops into the fulminant or rapidly progressing form, which can lead to death. 

As the patient gets worse, these symptoms may follow:
  • Circulation problems (only toxic/drug-induced hepatitis)
  • Dark urine
  • Dizziness (only toxic/drug-induced hepatitis)
  • Drowsiness (only toxic/drug-induced hepatitis)
  • Enlarged spleen (only alcoholic hepatitis)
  • Headache (only toxic/drug-induced hepatitis)
  • Hives
  • Itchy skin
  • Light colored feces, the feces may contain pus
  • Yellow skin, whites of eyes, tongue (jaundice)
Patient outcomes after the acute phase depend on various factors, especially the type of hepatitis.

Treatments for hepatitis

  • Hepatitis A - There is no treatment specifically for hepatitis A. Doctor will advise the patient to abstain from alcohol and drugs during the recovery. The vast majority of patients with Hepatitis A will recover spontaneously.

  • Hepatitis B - A patient with Hepatitis B needs to rest. He will require a diet that is high in protein and carbohydrate - this is to repair damaged liver cells, as well as to protect the liver. If this is not enough, the doctor may prescribe interferon. Interferon is an antiviral agent.

  • Hepatitis C - A patient with Hepatitis C will be prescribed pegylated interferon and ribavirin.

  • Hepatitis D or E - So far, there is no effective treatment for either Hepatitis D or E.

  • Non-Viral Hepatitis - If the patient has non-viral hepatitis, the doctor needs to remove the harmful substance. It will be flushed out of the stomach by hyperventilation or induced vomiting. Patients with drug-induced hepatitis may be prescribed corticosteroids.

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